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  • Ann Mounsey Bartholomew

    by Silke Wenzel
    Names:
    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew
    Birth name: Ann Mounsey
    Lebensdaten:
    b in London, England
    d in London, England
    Activities:
    Composer, Organist, Pianist, Music Teacher
    Characteristic statement:

    “We have often awarded much praise to the vocal compositions of Mrs. Bartholomew, but this is unquestionably one of the best we have yet seen from her pen. A light and characteristic symphony well prepares us for the nature of the verses chosen by the composer, the setting of which is materially aided by the highly dramatic accompaniment, which is skilfully varied with the changes of feeling in the poetry. We particularly admire the subdued and melodious phrase commencing with the words ‚And listen to celestial sounds;’ and the modulation into E flat minor may be cited as a remarkably happy point.”


    (The Musical Times, September 1st, 1877, p. 437 about “The Song of a Sprite”)


    Profile

    The composer, pianist, organist and choral conductor Ann Mounsey Bartholomew studied at Johann Bernhard Logier’s piano academy and later took private organ lessons with Samuel Wesley and Thomas Attwood. At 17 years of age she got her first job as organist in a church in London and went on to work as church musician in St. Vedast’s Church, Foster Lane from 1837 until 1882. For many years, she ran the ‘Crosby Hall Sacred Concerts’, which quickly became one of London’s most popular concert series. Ann Mousey Bartholomew also gave private lessons in organ, piano and music theory and was known as an exceptional teacher.


    Her extensive catalogue of compositions comprises both sacred and secular works. It includes an oratorio, cantatas and odes, partsongs and around 120 songs for solo voice and piano, numerous compositions for piano and various solo instruments, as well as arrangements of works by inter alia Benedetto Marcello, Ludwig van Beethoven and Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy. In addition, Ann Mousey Bartholomew published collections based on her pedagogical and liturgical work, for example ‘Sacred Harmony. A Collection of Psalm & Hymn Tunes, Chants’ from 1860, ‘Hymns of Prayer & Praise’, which she published with her sister Elizabeth Mounsey in 1867, and the album ‘The Young Vocalist: A Collection of Twelve Songs’, also published in 1867. From the end of the 1830s, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew worked with the author, poet and translator William Bartholomew, whom she went on to marry in 1853.

    Cities and countries

    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew was born in London and spent her life there.

    Biography

    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew was born the eldest child of Thomas Mounsey, a grocer and amateur violinist, and his wife Mary (nee Briggs) on April 17th, 1811 in London. Her sister, Elizabeth Mounsey (1819–1905), also became a professional musician.


    From the age of six, Ann Mounsey studied at pianist Johann Bernhard Logier’ renowned piano institute and thus received lessons in piano and music theory from a young age. Louis Spohr, who visited the institute in 1820, commented on the education there in his ‘Lebenserinnerungen [memoirs]’: “sehr bemerkenswert in der Lehrmethode des Herr Logier, daß er seine Schüler von der ersten Lektion an mit dem Klavierspiele zugleich die Harmonie lehrt. [very remarkable in the teaching method of Mr. Logier, that he teaches his pupils harmony right from the first lesson]”. He goes on: “Wie dies geschieht, ist mir unbekannt [...]. Das Resultat dieser Methode ist aber bei seinen Schüler staunenswert! Kinder zwischen sieben und zehn Jahren, die noch nicht länger als vier Monate Unterricht haben, lösen die schwierigsten Aufgaben. [How this happens is unknown to me [...]. However, the result of this method is astonishing among its students! Children between the ages of seven and ten, who have not studied for more than four months, can solve the most difficult tasks].” (Spohr [1968], Vol. 2, pp. 87f.) During his visit, Louis Spohr also met Ann Mounsey Bartholomew, praising her for the best harmonisation: “Nun war alles voller Leben und Tätigkeit, und schon nach einigen Minuten brachte mir eins der kleinsten Mädchen, die sich schon im Spiel und bei den frühern Aufgaben ausgezeichnet hatte, ihre Tafel zu Ansicht. [...] Da nun ihre Auflösung unstreitig den besten Baß hatte, so schrieb sie der Lehrer in mein Stammbuch, und ich gebe sie mit diplomatischer Genauigkeit wieder [Now everything was buzzing with life and activity, and after a few minutes, one of the smallest girls, who had already distinguished herself in her playing and in the previous tasks, brought me her work have a look. [...] Since her solution undoubtedly had the best bass, the teacher wrote it in my book, and I reproduce it here with diplomatic precision.” (Spohr [1968], p. 89) In addition to her training in piano and music theory, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew received private organ lessons from the conductor and concert organist Samuel Wesley and from Thomas Attwood, the organist St. Paul's Cathedral London.


    Following her studies, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew worked for almost 55 years as a church musician in London. In 1828, aged 17, she got her first job as a church organist in the London suburb of Clapton, transferred to St. Michael’s Church, Wood Street in 1829, and finally became the organist at St. Vedast’s Church in Foster Lane. She served in this position for almost 50 years, until her retirement in 1883. At the same time, she worked as a music teacher and gave private lessons in organ, piano and music theory. She was recognized early on and publicly honoured as an outstanding musician: she was elected an associate of the London Philharmonic Society (see Grove 1879) in 1834 and in 1839, she became a member of the Royal Society of Musicians (see Champlin 1888ff.).


    From 1843 to 1848, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew ran a concert series (six concerts per season) at the Crosby Hall in London, for which she was able to secure many exceptional musicians as soloists. She herself featured as solo organist, composer and, most likely, choral conductor. She programmed works by inter alia Henry Purcell, Johann Sebastian Bach, Carl Heinrich Graun, Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, Luigi Cherubini, Joseph Haydn and Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy. The ‘Crosby Hall Sacred Concerts’ were received enthusiastically by audiences and the press alike. The Musical Times, for example, wrote in February 1845: “A feature in these concerts, is the selection of music for performance, which is not usually heard in public [...]. The Hall was well filled with an attentive audience.” (The Musical Times, February 1st, 1845, p. 71) In December 1846, the Times again wrote: “Miss Mounsey has commenced her annual series of six sacred concerts [...]. These are among the best musical entertainments of the city. Miss Mounsey, a composer and organist of talent, affords her gratuitous assistance, and superintends the getting up of the concerts. The first for the present season was well attended, and the program is highly interesting. Among the most attractive features were a Te Deum by Mendelssohn, choruses by Grawn and Handel, a corale by Bach, and a canon by Cherubini. Miss Mounsey performed on Andante from one of Haydn's symphonies, followed by a fugue of Albrechtsberger, on the organ.” (The Musical Times, December 4th, 1846, p. 5) The Musical Times summarised the reasons behind the great success: “The establishment of these entertainments, having for their object the promulgation of the highest order of musical compositions in a part of the metropolis to which hitherto they have had no access, is deserving of great praise. Much pains is also expended in the performance of works of the great masters, the principal vocalists in London being invariably engaged and adequately cared for with the rehearsals.” (The Musical Times January 1st / February 1st, 1847, p. 69)


    On April 28th, 1853, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew married the violinist and writer William Bartholomew (1793-1867), who had translated, amongst others, the libretti for several works by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy into English, including the libretto for the oratorio ‘Elijah’ and the incidental music to ‘Antigone’.


    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew’s extensive catalogue of compositions comprises both sacred and secular works. It includes an oratorio, cantatas and odes, partsongs and around 120 songs for solo voice and piano. She published numerous compositions for piano and various solo instruments, including quadrilles, polkas, mazurkas and tarantellas, as well as variations on familiar themes and melodies. In addition, numerous collections came out of her liturgical work, e.g. the ‘Four hymns for children’, ‘Sacred Harmony. A Collection of Psalm & Hymn Tunes, Chants, & co’ from 1860, the hymn book ‘Hymns of Prayer & Praise’ from 1867, which remained in use in British ‘Society of Evangelization’ for a long time, and the collection ‘Congregational Church Music (Psalms and Hymns from Holy Scripture, for chanting)’, which appeared in two volumes in 1876 and 1878 and was then reprinted in1881. Most of her compositions and collections were printed by renowned London publishers, including Novello, Ewer & Co., Stanley Lucas, Weber & Co., Brewer & Co. and Duncan Davison & Co.

    By the end of the 1930s, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew had produced several vocal works in collaboration with her (later) husband William Batholomew, who himself wrote texts for her to set, adapted German texts, e.g. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s ‘Erlkönig’ and ‘Mignon’, and set well known melodies to text, which Ann re-harmonised. On January 17th, 1855, her oratorio ‘The Nativity’ op. 29, with a libretto by her husband, was premiered at London's St. Martin's Hall under the baton of John Hullah. The Musical Times noted, “The new oratorio, (called the 'Nativity', by Mrs. Mounsey Bartolomew, was produced here on the 17th of January; and was received with much applause by a large audience.” (The Musical Times, February 1st, 1855, p. 295)


    Although Ann Mounsey Bartholomew had been publishing her compositions since the beginning of the 1930s, regular reviews in the press came relatively late, in the 1860s, by which time Ann Mounsey Bartholomew was already well known as a composer and musician. It was not just the musical quality of the songs that convinced the reviewers, but often the structural and technical craftsmanship. In review of the song ‘Yesterday and To-morrow’, set to a poem by Charles Swain, The Musical Times wrote in January 1873: “Mr. Charles Swain’s thoughtful poetry has received a most sympathetic setting from Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew, whose name is a guarantee for musical excellence. Were the composer not so perfect a mistress of theory, the melody would be overladen with the weight of the accompaniment – for every note is harmonized – but the chords move on so smoothly with the voice-part that they enrich, without disturbing the flow of the theme. The effect of the unexpected chord of B flat, which commences the final phrase of each verse, ‚So ’twill be to-morrow,’ is extremely beautiful.” (The Musical Times, January 1st, 1873, p. 725) In 1877, regarding ‘The Song of a Sprite’, with text by Mrs. Radcliffe, it read: “We have often awarded much praise to the vocal compositions of Mrs. Bartholomew, but this is unquestionably one of the best we have yet seen from her pen. A light and characteristic symphony well prepares us for the nature of the verses chosen by the composer, the setting of which is materially aided by the highly dramatic accompaniment, which is skilfully varied with the changes of feeling in the poetry. We particularly admire the subdued and melodious phrase commencing with the words ‚And listen to celestial sounds;’ and the modulation into E flat minor may be cited as a remarkably happy point” (The Musical Times, September 1st, 1877, p. 427), and in a review of ‘Six Songs’ set to texts by inter alia William Shakespeare, Charles Mackay and Edgar Allan Poe, published in 1882 by Stanley Lucas, Weber & Co: “These Six Songs are a worthy contribution to the somewhat limited store of high-class vocal music by modern composer, for not only has Mrs. Bartholomew given an exquisite colouring to the words she has chosen, but the words are those which can only be fitly treated by a kindred artist. In No. 1 Shakespeare’s verses are set with a truly sympathetic feeling to a quaint subject in A minor, the modulations in the course of the song growing up naturally with the text, and the accompaniment forming so integral a portion of the composition as to demand something more than te average ‚accompanist at the pianoforte.’ [...] No. 6, from the ‚Percy Relics,’ effectively terminates a series of songs standing so completely apart from our fashionable works of the day as to make us believe that they must command the attention of all real artists.” (The Musical Times, July 1st, 1882, p. 397)


    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew’s works for piano were also very positively received. Referring to her ‘Six Variations on Mendelssohn’s ‘O Hills, O Vales’, published by Novello & Co. in 1871, The Musical Times wrote: “Mendelssohn’s beautiful Part-song has here received that sympathetic treatment which might have been expected from so accomplished a musician and so warm an admirer of the composer as Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew. The variations are all well written, each having a thoroughly distinctive character, which is well preserved throughout. No. 5, in the tonic minor, is excellently harmonised; and the final one, in which the theme is put into triple rhythm, contains some highly effective points.” (The Musical Times, June 1st, 1871, p. 116). To the bagatelle ‘A Whirligig’, dedicated to Walter Mcfarren, The Musical Times wrote in October 1872: “Pianists with a nimble finger will be delighted with this spirited little piece. It has a whirling subject in 9/8 rhythm [...]. The harmonies are simple and in accordance with the nature of the composition. The series of arpeggios on the third page lead well to the return of the theme; and the restless character of the piece is carefully kept up to the conclusion. The Bagatelle is dedicated to Mr. Walter Macfarren, who may be well entrusted to display its attractive qualities to an audience.” (The Musical Times, October 1st, 1871, p. 637)


    Her pedagogical collections and compositions were equally popular, e.g. ‘The Young Vocalist: A Collection of Twelve Songs, each with an accompaniment for the Pianoforte, selected from Mozart, Weber, Mendelssohn, Spohr etc. by Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew’ (London: Griffith and Farran, 1867), in which Ann Mounsey Bartholomew aimed to bridge the gap between music for children and adults: “Mrs. Bartholomew very truly says in her preface that most of the collections of songs for children ‚consists of old popular tunes, or they are of too fragmentary a character, being only eight bars in length.’ This defect has been remedied in the work before us, most of the specimens being of the average length of what may be called ‚grown up songs.’ The selection of the melodies has been judiciously made; and the words are simple, without degenerating into infanity. We cordially commend this volume as an excellent Christmas present to those children who, having escaped from the nursery, are not yet fully recognised in the drawing-room.” (The Musical Times, December 1st, 1867, p. 229) In 1881, Ann Mounsey Bartholomew dedicated her ‘Prelude and Gigue’ to the composer and school music teacher Clara Angela Macirone, adding “by her affectionate friend, Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew”, and thereby convincing once again reviewers from the Musical Times: We are glad to find Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew helping forward the cause of healthy musical education by contributing her share to the store of modern pianoforte works which reflect rather the solidity of the past than the shallowness of the present age. The Prelude and Gigue now before us [...] are excellent specimens of that style of writing to which so many of the standard composers occasionally devoted their talent [...]. The Gigue is just as melodious and lively as such a piece should be: and the modulations throughout are appropriate and effective.” (The Musical Times, April 1st, 1881, p. 200f)


    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew spent her last years in retirement. She died on June 24th, 1891 at 58 Brunswick Place, City Road in London.

    Appreciation

    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew played an active role in London’s musical scene for almost 60 years. Held in highest regard as a musician by her contemporaries, she was a composer, pianist, organist, church musician, concert organiser and music teacher. In his ‘Handbook of Musical Biography’ David Baptie noted in 1887: “Mrs. Bartholomew has produced several cantatas of a very high order, besides many spirited and tasteful part-songs.” (Baptie, 1887) The Musical Times wrote in her obituary: “Mrs. Bartholomew’s industry and versatility as a musician were alike remarkable. Her amiability of disposition endeared her to many friends, among whom may be counted all the most eminent musicians of the present century.” (The Musical Times, August 1st, 1891, p. 485) What makes her compositional work so exceptional is surely the marriage of her sacred and liturgical music and her secular compositions for children, schools, salons and concert halls – a union represented particularly well in the 1876 collection ‘Holy Thoughts in Song. Words by Milton, Heber, Bonar, Grant. The music adapted from Beethoven, Weber, Spohr, Mozart etc.’

    List of works

    Ann Mounsey Bartholomew's initial catalogue was compiled based on contemporary press reviews and encyclopaedia articles, Pazdírek 1904ff., The New Grove (2001), Waddington 2006, and digital library catalogues, in particular the British composite catalogue, Copac. Missing information regarding publishers and publication dates could not be obtained. Only a small number of compositions exist with opus numbers.




    Choral Works


    Cantatas and Oratorios


    The Nativity op. 29. Pastoral Oratorio. Für vier Solostimmen (SATB), Four-part Chorus und Klavier. Text von William Bartholomew. London: Cramer, Beale & Co., 1855.


    Supplication & Thanksgiving op. 52. A sacred cantata. Für vier Solostimmen (SATB), Four-part Chorus (SATB) und Klavier. Texte ausgewählt aus den Psalmen von William Bartholomew. London: Metzler & Co., 1864.


    The Farewell. A Cantata (Text: L. E. L.). London: Paine & Hopkins 1835.


    A Choral Ode, performed at Birmingham on the occasion of Prince Albert having laid the foundation stone of the Midland Institute, November 22nd, 1855 (Text: William Bartholomew) op. 31. London: Addison & Hollier, 1855.



    Sacred Music Collections for Choir and/or Congregational Singing


    A Collection of Sacred Music as used at St. Michael's Church, Wood Street. Composed, selected by J. Banner. With an additional Hymn by Miss A. Mounsey. London: R. W. Keith Prowse & Co., 1840.


    The Christian Month. A series of original Hymns adapted from the daily Psalms with Chants and Anthems, the poetry by the Rev. W. Palin. Composed for one or more voices and arranged with interludes for the organ or Piano Forte op. 19. London, 1842.


    Four hymns for children. Six chants and a dismission. London 1851.


    Six Hymn Tunes. Composed and harmonized by Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew. ca. 1860.


    Sacred Harmony. A Collection of Psalm & Hymn Tunes, Chants, &c. The words selected from a volume by the Rev. W. J. Hall. With original Interludes to each Tune newly arranged for the Organ or Piano Forte. London: T. E. Purday, 1860.


    Hymns of Prayer & Praise: (including those in general use) with chants, kyries etc. (gemeinsam mit Elizabeth Mounsley) London: Brewer & Co., 1867.


    Congregational Church Music (Psalms and Hymns from Holy Scripture, for chanting). The music composed or arranged by Mrs. M. Bartholomew and others. Enlarged edition. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1881 (Erstauflage in zwei Bänden 1876 und 1878).


    Holy Thoughts in Song. Words by Milton, Heber, Bonar, Grant. The music adapted from Beethoven, Weber, Spohr, Mozart etc., London 1876.


    Nine Chants composed for three settings of the Te Deum Laudamus. London: Novello & Co., 1882.



    Secular Choral Music Collections

    Six four-part songs with a Piano Forte accompaniment ad libitum op. 30 (Texte: W. Bartholomew, W. Drummond, Shelley, Herrick). London: Ewer & Co., 1855.

    Six four-part Songs, with Piano Forte accompaniment ad libitum op. 37. London: Ewer & Co., 1857.

    Three four-part Songs written for the Vocal Association op. 39 (Texte: W. Bartholomew). London 1858.

    1. Jack o' lantern – 2. Sleep – 3. Echo chorus


    Polyhymnia; a collection of Part Songs and Glees, with an ad libitum accompaniment for the Piano Forte. Book I. op. 32. Book 2 op. 33. London: P. Addison, Hollier & Lucas, 1855.



    Individual Choral Works (sacred/secular)


    A wet sheet and flowing sail. Part-song (SATB). London: Pitman, o. J.


    A Wreath for Christmas. Four-part song (SATB). Text: J. Enderssohn. Veröffentlicht in: „The Musical Times“ vom 1. Dezember 1876, S. 699f.


    Before thine eyelids close. Part-song (Text: W. Bartholomew). In: Callcott (J. G.) Cramer, Wood & Co.'s series of new part songs Nr. 15, 1875.


    Blow, thou winter wind (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Chords and Words (SATB). Part-song. Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Come, honey bee. Part-song (SSA). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Echo Chorus („Spirits! Elves of Fairyland“). Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Gentle Spring. Four-part song (SATB). Words imitated from the German by W. Bartholomew. London: Addison, Hollier & Lucas, 1855.

    Golden slumbers kiss your eyes. Part-song (TTBB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Holy is the Lord of Hosts. Anthem für Chor. London 1866.


    Homeward. Part-song (TTBB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Jack o’ Lantern. Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Lady, awake! Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Like as a Damask Rose. Four-part song. London 1871.


    Man's Medley. Four-part song op. 42 (Text: G. Herbert). London 1860.


    Onwards! Part-song (SSA). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Philomela sings. Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen, vor 1869 (Aufführung: „The Musical Times“ vom 1. Mai 1869, S. 90).


    Sanctus and three Kyrie eleesons. London: Novello & Co., 1853.


    Shun [sic] delays – the breed remorse. Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Sweet day so cool. Four-part song (SATB) (Text: G. Herbert). London: Pitman, 1860.


    Take care! take care! („Maiden, wouldst thou happy me"). Part-song. (Text: W. Bartholomew). London: Novello & Co., 1862.


    Tell Me, Where is Fancy Bred. Four-part song (SATB). Text: William Shakespeare. Veröffentlicht in: The Musical Times vom 1. April 1864, S. 261-265; London: Novello & Co., ca. 1865.


    The Cuckoo. Four-part song (Text: W. Bartholomew). London 1860; 1874.


    The Fairies Lullaby (SSA). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    The Golden Age. Part-song (SATB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen, vor 1868 (Aufführung: „The Musical Times“ vom 1. Mai 1868, S. 378).


    The Lark („Now leaves his wat'ry nest“). Four-part song (SATB) mit Klavierbegleitung (ad lib.) (Text: William Davenant). London: Addison, Hollier & Lucas, 1859.

    The lark's song. Kanon (SATB) mit Klavierbegleitung ad lib. nach Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, op. 47. London: Ewer & Co., 1848.

    The Sailor’s Adieu. Part-song (ATBB). Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    We sing the Scale. Four-part song. London ca. 1860.


    When Gossips love. Part-song (SATB). London: Pitman, o. J.



    Works for Solo Voice


    Secular Collections


    Songs of Remembrance. London 1835.


    Six Duets in Canon for two Soprano voices, with an accompaniment for the Piano Forte op. 11. London: T. E. Purday, 1836.


    Lyrics for Youth op. 18 (Text: William Bartholomew). London: T. E. Purday 1840.


    Three Songs with accompaniments for two performers on the Piano Forte op. 16. English translations by William Bartholomew. London: J. J. Ewer & Co., 1840.

    1. There be none of Beauty's Daughters – 2. Der Todtentanz, von J. W. v. Goethe – 3. Die Elfen Königin, von Matthesson.


    Six Songs op. 20 (Texte Nr. 1-5 William Bartholomew; Nr. 6 Sir Walter Scott). London: C. Ollivier, 1840.


    Six Songs, composed for the Royal Society of Female Musicians, 1845. Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Six Songs. Composed by Ann S. Mounsey Bartholomew. Stanley Lucas, Weber and Co, 1882. 1. Crabbed age and youth („Crabbed age and youth“, Text: William Shakespeare) – 2. Fair and True („Ripe as peaches, fresh as morning“, Text: Charles Mackay) – 3. Wedded Love („When on her maker's bosom“, Text: Bishop Heber) – 4. The Bells („Hear the sledges with the bells“, Text: Edgar Allan Poe) – 5. Parting („We watch'd her breathing thro' the night“, Text: Thomas Hood) – 6. Queen Mab’s Song („Come follow me“, Text: From the „Percy Relics“)



    Individual Editions (secular/sacred)


    A Fairy Song („Stars are beaming“) (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1845.


    A Nutshell Novel („A winning wile“). Song (Text: T. A. Sterry). London 1877.


    A Song of Praise („Praise God“) (Text: W. Pennefather). London: Duncan Davison and Co, 1876.


    All the Winds are sleeping. An Evening Song (Text: William Bartholomew). London: D'Almaine & Co, ca. 1845.


    Angry Words. Song (Text: J. Middleton). London ca. 1872.


    Birds in Summer. Song (Text: Mrs. Howitt). London: C. Jefferys 1850.


    Charming maiden. Song. (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1862.


    Constancy („Yonder star“). Song (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1862.


    Day is past. Song (Text: Mrs. Hemans). London: C. Jefferys, 1850.


    Days gone by. Canzonet („When thou at eventide“) (Text: Delta). London 1865.


    Dreaming and Waking. Song (Text: Mrs. Pfeiffer). London: Duncan Davison and Co, 1876.


    Enchanting maid, adieu! A Farewell („Once more, enchanting maid“) (Text: S. Rogers). London, 1835.


    Faire Daffodils. Song (Text: Herrick). London, 1835.


    Flow, murmuring stream. Song (Text: C. Neale). London 1870.


    Gently, gently will I glide. Ballad. London: Johanning & Co, 1835.


    God provideth for the „morrow“ („Lo! the lilies“). A sacred song (Text: Bishop Heber). London 1870.


    Happy days („O happy hours“). Duet (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1862.


    Home op. 49 Nr. 2. Song (Text: B. Barton). Preston: J. Norwood 1862


    Hope. A Duet for Soprano and Contralto (Text: William Bartholomew). London: Foster & King, 1865.


    I hear his Horn. Song (Text: William Bartholomew) op. 49 Nr. 1. Preston: J. Norwood 1862.


    I heard the voice of Jesus say. A sacred song (Text: Horatius Bonar). London: Novello, Ewer and Co 1876.


    I sing because I love to sing. Song. London 1874.


    If all the world and love were young. Song (Text: Sir W. Raleigh). London: Robert W. Ollivier, 1865.


    If I could only tell („He whisper'd sweet and gentle words“) (Text: J. Enderssohn). London: Alfred Hays, 1875.


    Know'st thou the Land. Mignon's Song. Translated from Goethe by W. Ball. London 1835.


    Ladye mine. Ballad, the poetry from an old author. London 1834.


    Life is full of pearls („Where the smiling Maidens“). An Hungarian dancing song. The words translated by Dr Bowring. London 1849.


    Life's Voyage. Duet for Soprano & Bass (Text: Thomas Moore). London: J. Williams 1865.


    Love. A Canzonet (Text: W. Bartholomew). London ca. 1835.


    Mary meet me there („Wilt thou“). Ballad (Text: William Ball). London 1833.


    Moonlight („Over fields of thymy blossom“). (Text: Mrs. Ellis). London 1855.


    Nearer, my God, to Thee. Sacred Song (Text: Mrs. S. F. Adams). London: J. Williams, 1867.


    Now I am thine, thine only. Song. London ca. 1850.


    One by One. Song (Text: Miss A. Procter). London 1866.


    Pray without ceasing („Go when the morning“). Sacred song (Text: Lord Morpeth). London 1870.


    Prepare to meet thy God. Sacred Song (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1861.


    Questions. Druck nicht nachgewiesen.


    Regrets („I might have had“). A canzonet (Text: Mrs. Newall). London: Novello, Ewer & Co., 1878.


    Rosebuds („Gather ye“). Song (Text: Herrick). London 1865.


    Song of Spring. Duet. London: J. Curwen & Sons, 1901.


    Song of the Summer Winds. Glee for 3 voices (Text: G. Darley). London: T. E. Purday, 1835.


    Speak gently. Song (Text: G. W. Longford) op. 50 Nr. 2. London: J. Williams, 1862.


    St. Vedast. [Hymn-tune]. Manuskript ca. 1840.


    Stars of the Summer Night. Song. (Text: H. W. Longfellow). London: J. Williams, 1860.


    Ten Years ago. Canzonet (Text: A. A. Watts). London 1873.


    The Bridesmaid. Ballad (Text: E. Fitz Ball). London: Johanning & Co, 1835.


    The Castanet's gay sound. A Spanish Serenade („The Citron's odour floats“) (Text: W. Bartholomew). London 1849.


    The Cherry Earrings. Ballad (Text: Miss Chisholm). London: J. Williams 1867.


    The Daguerreotype. A Comic Song, with an accompaniment for the Piano-Forte [veröffentlicht unter dem Pseudonym Phaeton). London 1839.


    The Erl King. Text: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. English translation by William Bartholomew op. 12. London: J. A. Novello, 1840.


    The fortune teller („Tawny and weird with raven hair“). London: Alfred Hays, 1875.


    The Fountain. Song (Text: J. R. Lowell). London: J. Shepherd, 1870.


    The Frost King („Hark! who is this“). A fantasia. Song (Text: William Bartholomew). London ca. 1830.

    The Lily of the Vale. Song (Text: William Bartholomew), 1851.


    The loving nightingale („How sweet it is“). Duet (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1864.


    The Maid who vow'd to love me. Song. London: Mori and Lavenu, 1834.


    The Merry Beggar's Song („Here's a health“). London, 1874.


    The mourner's hope („O thou who dry'st“). Duet (Text: Thomas Moore). London: Cramer, Beale & Wood, 1863.


    The Nautilus Cradle. Song. (Text: William Bartholomew). London: T. E. Purday, 1840.


    The Northern Star. Song (Text: Charles Mackay). London: Mori & Lavenu, 1835.


    The Praise of a Country Life. Song op. 50 Nr. 1 (Text: Sir H. Wotton). London: J. Williams, 1862.


    The Rose. Song (Text: C. J. Fox). London 1859.


    The Song of a Sprite ("In the sightless air") (Text: Mrs. Radcliffe). London: Samuel Brewer, 1877.


    The Soul's Release („When the spark“) Song. (Text: T. Dale) aus: Six Sacred Songs Nr. 1, 1859.


    The Tambourine Player („I love my little native isle“) (Text: Charles Mackay). London: Stanley Lucas, Weber and Co, 1879.


    The Treasures of the Deep („What hid'st thou“). Duet (Text: Mrs. Hemans). London 1880.

    The Uncertainty of Life („What is life“). Song (Text: Kelly), 1859. In: Six Sacred Songs Nr. 2.


    The Warrior's Love. Song, with an accompaniment for the Piano Forte (Text: J. F. H. B.). London: Johanning & Co., ca. 1835.


    The Wedding Day. Song (Text: Henry Fothergill Chorley). London: Johanning & Co., ca. 1835.


    Ti saluto. A Salutation. Song (Text: G. E. Mackay). London 1879.


    Tiny Flow'r with snowy Bells. Song. London 1858.


    Together („Babes that on a morn of May“). Song (Text: Miss Amelia B. Edwards). London: Novello, Ewer & Co., 1877.

    Trill on, forest bird. Duet (Text: William Bartholomew). London 1862.


    When Day has fled. Song with an accompaniment for the Piano Forte (Text: W. Ball). London: Johanning & Co., ca. 1835.


    When should Lovers breathe their Vows. Song (Text: L. E. L.). London ca. 1835.


    Yesterday and To-morrow. Song. Text: Charles Swain. London: Novello, Ewer and Co., 1872.



    Instrumental/Piano Works


    A grand duet for the Piano Forte op. 13. London 1837.


    A Whirligig. Bagatelle for the Pianoforte. London: Duncan Davison and Co., 1872.


    Ariel. Mazurka brillante for the Pianoforte. London 1858.


    Atalanta. Duet for the Piano Forte op. 51. London: Foster & King, ca. 1865.


    Britons, strike Home (Henry Purcell) with variations, as a Duet for the Piano Forte op. 48. London: J. Williams, 1863.


    Capriccio for the Piano Forte, intended as a study for the right hand op. 10. London: T. E. Purday, 1835.


    Compiegne. Rondo à la chasse for the Pianoforte op. 54. London 1868.


    Du du. German air, the variations composed for the pianoforte op. 41. London 1859.


    Introduction & variations on the Scotch air 'Comin' thro' the Rye' and 'The Bonnie wee Wife,' arranged as a Rondo for two performers on the Piano-Forte. London: I. Willis & Co., ca. 1830.


    Italia. Tarantelle for the Piano Forte op. 55. London: Metzler & Co., ca. 1868.


    La Charité Waltz, for the Pianoforte. London 1863.


    La Jeunesse. Rondino à la valse op. 36 Nr. 1. London 1857.


    La Napolitaine. Second Tarantelle for the Piano. London: Novello & Co., 1873.


    La Sicilienne, Rondoletto for the Piano Forte. Op. 36 Nr. 3. London 1857.


    Le Départ pour Munich. Rondo varié for the Piano Forte. London: J. Green, 1835.


    Le Petit Soldat, March for the Piano Forte op. 36 Nr. 4. London 1857.


    Les trois amis, composed for three performers on one piano op. 38 Nr. 1. London 1859.


    Polyphemus and Galatea. Studies for the left and right hands op. 36. London: Addison, Hollier & Lucas, 1857.


    Prelude an Gigue for the Pianoforte. London: Duncan Davison and Co., 1881.


    Rousseau's dream, with variations for the pianoforte op. 44. London 1859.


    Six grand Waltzes for the pianoforte. London: Clementi, Collard & Collard, ca. 1830.


    Six Polonaises for the Piano Forte & Violin. London: C. Vernon ca. 1830.


    Six Songs without words for the Pianoforte. London 1865.


    Six Variations on Mendelssohn’s ‚O Hills, O Vales.’ For the Pianoforte. London: Novello & Co., 1871.


    Slow movements for the Organ or Harmonium. London 1873.

    Swiss Rondo for the Piano Forte. London: Johanning & Co., ca. 1835.


    The Alhambra Quadrilles for the Piano Forte op. 28. London: C. Jefferys, ca. 1855.


    The Benares march and the Bangalore march for the piano forte op. 22. London 1851.


    The Brunswick Polka, for the Piano Forte op. 21. London: Charles & Robert Ollivier, 1845.


    The Brunswick Quadrilles for the Piano Forte or Harp. London: Clementi & Co., 1830.


    The Classical Quadrilles, on themes selected from the works of Weber, Spohr, Mendelssohn, Mozart and Beethoven, arranged for the Piano Forte (Solo and duet). London: Cramer, Beale & Co.,1850.


    The Cumberland Quadrilles for the Piano Forte or Harp. London: Johanning & Co., 1835.


    The Gondola Nocturne for the Piano Forte op. 27. London: C. Jefferys, 1855.


    The last Rose of Summer as a Duet for the Pianoforte. London 1860.


    The Peri. A Rondino for the Piano Forte op. 36 Nr. 2. London 1857.


    The Snowdrops. A set of Quadrilles as Duets for the Piano Forte op. 15. London: G. Peachey, 1840.


    The Sydenham March. Trio for three performers on one Piano Forte op. 43. London: T. Purday ca. 1860.


    The Wolseley March for the Pianoforte. London: Duncan Davison & Co., 1883.


    Three Studies for the Pianoforte op. 52. London 1864.


    Titania. Pensée fugitive for the Piano Forte op. 40. London: R. W. Ollivier 1860.


    Two mazurkas for the piano forte op. 26. London 1852.


    Variations for the piano forte on the Portuguese hymn „Adeste fideles“ op. 34. London 1856.


    Variations on Le Desir. Waltz for Pianoforte op. 24. London: R. W. Ollivier, ca. 1850 (= Morceaux de Plaisir Nr. 3).



    Arrangements, Harmonisations and Albums


    Alla Trinità. An ancient Trinity hymn („Father, heaven and earth's creator“) (Text: William Bartholomew), harmonized by Miss Mounsey. London ca. 1850.


    God save and bless Napoleon. Nach der Melodie „Partant pour la Syrie“ (Text: William Bartholomew), harmonized for four voices by Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew. London: Addison & Hollier, 1855.


    The Child's Vocal Album, written & adapted by William Bartholomew to melodies chiefly selected from the works of the most admired composers and arranged with easy accompaniments for the Piano Forte by A. S. Mounsey. London: C. Ollivier and T. E. Purday, 1840.


    The Young Vocalist: A Collection of Twelve Songs, each with an accompaniment for the Pianoforte, selected from Mozart, Weber, Mendelssohn, Spohr. London: Griffith and Farran, 1867.


    Thirty-four original tunes: Set to favourite hymns by Milton, Heber, Montgomery, Keble, Bonar, Elliott u.a. London: James Nisbet & Co, 1883.


    Beethoven, Ludwig van. The ruins of Athens. Music drama. Incidental music für Chor (SATB) und Klavier, übersetzt und bearbeitet von William Bartholomew. Arrangement für Chor mit Klavierbegleitung. London: Ewer & Co., 1844.


    Beethoven, Ludwig van. King Stephen of Hungary. Music drama. Incidental music für Chor (SATB) und Klavier zu A. v. Kotzebue's Festspiel "König Stephan oder Ungarns erster Wohltäter", übersetzt und bearbeitet von William Bartholomew. Arrangement für Chor mit Klavierbegleitung. London: Ewer & Co., zwischen 1851 and 1859.


    Bériot, Charles de. Rondo Russe. Arranged for the Piano Forte by A. S. Mounsey. London: T. Boosey & Co, 1840.


    Haydn, Joseph. Six Choruses arranged for the Piano-Forte or Organ by Miss Mounsey. London: T. E. Purday 1840.


    Marcello, Benedetto. Six sacred duetts. With English words adapted by William Bartholomew. Accompaniment by A. S. Mounsey. London: Robert W. Ollivier 1850.

    1. Blessed is he – 2. Why do the heathen – 3. Bless the Lord – 4. In mercy look on me – 5. I will not fear! – 6. I will sing of thy mercies.


    Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix. Four Songs (Text: William Bartholomew. London 1854.


    Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix. The lark's song, a canon, for soprano, alto, tenor and bass with pianoforte accompaniment ad lib. by Ann S. Mounsey op. 47. London: Ewer & Co, 1848.


    Schulz, Leonard. Rondo à la Chasse, originally composed for the Guitar, arranged for the Piano Forte by Miss Mounsey. London: Johanning & Co, 1835.

    Repertoire

    Almost nothing is known about Ann Mounsey Bartholomew’s repertoire, even though she performed as a pianist, organist and choral conductor throughout her life. Only the ‘Crosby Hall Sacred Concerts’, which she organised, provide a small insight into the repertoire she performed. Included are compositions by Henry Purcell, Johann Sebastian Bach, Carl Heinrich Graun, Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, Luigi Cherubini, Joseph Haydn and Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, whose setting of Psalm 55 ‘Hear my prayer’ (for soloist, choir and organ) was written for her concert series and which she herself premiered in January 1845.

    Sources

    Literature


    Artikel „Mounsey“. In: A dictionary of music and musicians, hg. v. Sir George Grove, 4 Bde., London 1879 und folgende Auflagen (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Bartholomew (Mrs. W.)“. In: A handbook of musical biography, hg. v. David Baptie, 2. Aufl. London 1887 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Bartholomew, Ann Sheppard Mounsey“. In: Cyclopedia of music and musicians, hg. v. J. D. Champlin, 3 Bde., 1888-1890 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Bartholomew, Ann Sheppard“. In: Modern English biography, hg. v. F. Boase, 6 Bde., 1892-1921 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Bartholomew, Ann Sheppard“. In: British Musical Biography, hg. v. J. D. Brown/S. S. Stratton, 1897 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Bartholomew (Ann Sheppard, nee Mounsey)“. In: Otto Ebel: Women composers, 3. Aufl. 1913 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Mounsey (Ann Sheppard). In: Black’s dictionary of music and musicians, hg. v. L. J. de Bekker, 1924 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Artikel „Mrs. Mounsey Bartholomew“. In: David Baptie: Sketches of The English glee composers, 1896 (verfügbar in wbis – world biographical information system).


    Bernstein, Jane A. Artikel „Mounsey, Ann (Sheppard)“. In: The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Second Edition, ed. by Stanley Sadie. London: Macmillan, 2001, Bd. 17, S. 235f.


    Bernstein, Jane A. Artikel „Mounsey, Ann (Sheppard)“. In: The new Grove dictionary of women composers. Julie Anne Sadie (Hg.). London: Macmillan, 1995, S. 337f.


    Fornoff, Christine. Artikel „Mounsey, Familie“. In: Instrumentalistinnen-Lexikon des Sophie-Drinker-Instituts (online), hg. v. Freia Hoffmann. http://www.sophie-drinker-institut.de/cms/index.php?page=mounsey-schwestern (Stand: 16. Oktober 2012).


    Fuller, Sophie. The Pandora Guide to Women Composers. Britain and the United States 1629 – Present. London: Pandora, 1994.


    Gillett, Paula. Musical Women in England 1870-1914. „Encroaching on all Man’s Privileges“. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.


    Pazdírek, Franz (Hg.). Universalhandbuch der Musikliteratur aller Zeiten und Völker, Wien: Pazdírek & Co., 1904-1910.


    Spohr, Louis. Lebenserinnerungen. Hg. v. Folker Göthel, Bd. 2. Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1968.


    Stratton, Stephen S. Woman in Ralation to Musical Art. In: Proceedings of the Musical Association 9 (1882/83), S. 115-146.


    Waddington, Patrick. Artikel „Bartholomew, Ann Shepherd (1811–1891)“. In: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, May 2006 http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/59342 (Stand: 19. Oktober 2012).



    Journals und Press Reviews


    The Musical Times, February 1st, 1845, p. 71.

    The Musical Times, January 1st / February 1st, 1847, p. 69.

    The Musical Times, February 1st, 1855, p. 295.

    The Musical Times, December 1st, 1867, p. 229.

    The Musical Times, May 1st, 1871, p. 73.

    The Musical Times, June 1st, 1871, p. 116.

    The Musical Times, October 1st, 1872, p. 637.

    The Musical Times, January 1st, 1873, p. 725.

    The Musical Times, September 1st, 1877, p. 437.

    The Musical Times, April 1st, 1881, p. 200f.

    The Musical Times, Juli 1st, 1882, p. 397.

    The Musical Times, August 1st, 1891, p. 485 (Obituary).


    The Times, December 4th, 1846, p. 5.



    Links


    http://www.sophie-drinker-institut.de/cms/index.php?page=mounsey-schwestern (Accessed: October 16th, 2012)

    The Sophie Drinker Institute’s instrumentalist lexicon (online) contains an article on the sisters Ann Mounsey Bartholomew and Elizabeth Mounsey.


    http://www.concertprogrammes.org.uk/html/search/verb/GetRecord/4450

    The British ‘Concert Program Database’ refers to a bound archive collection held at the British Library / Music Collection, in which all programmes and text booklets from six years of the ‘Crosby Hall Sacred Concerts’ have been preserved.

    Research

    Further research information on Ann Mounsey Bartholomew is not available.

    Need for research

    Further research into Ann Mounsey Bartholomew’s biography, occupations and compositions is required, along with her personal and artistic contacts.

    Normdaten

    Virtual International Authority File (VIAF): 29280621
    Deutsche Nationalbibliothek (GND): 1033577162
    Library of Congress (LCCN): no2006026646
    Wikipedia-Personensuche

    Autor/innen

    Silke Wenzel


    Bearbeitungsstand

    Redaktion: Regina Back
    Zuerst eingegeben am 14.05.2013
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 15.02.2018


    Empfohlene Zitierweise

    Silke Wenzel, Artikel „Ann Mounsey Bartholomew“, in: MUGI. Musikvermittlung und Genderforschung: Lexikon und multimediale Präsentationen, hg. von Beatrix Borchard und Nina Noeske, Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg, 2003ff. Stand vom 15.2.2018
    URL: http://mugi.hfmt-hamburg.de/artikel/Ann_Mounsey_Bartholomew